Cards Against Humanity's Black Friday "Sale"

Cards Against Humanity’s “$5 More” Black Friday Sale A lot of people have been curious about how our “everything costs $5 more“ Black Friday sale worked, and if it was successful for us.
We initially started talking about doing a Black Friday sale over the summer, and came up with the idea of a “$0.01 off” coupon. I liked the idea, but have always maintained a policy of no deals, no discounts, and no sales  for Cards Against Humanity, even during our Kickstarter. To me the game is always $25, it’s never another price, and doing any kind of deal or discount undermines the simplicity and honesty of the game.
Execution
Nothing crazy here. I put together a landing page and we replaced all the “buy” buttons on our site with the new pricing. I edited the FAQ to include:
Why do all of your products cost more today?
We’re participating in the tradition of “Black Friday,” an American holiday celebrating a time when the Wampanoag tribe saved the settlers of Plymouth Colony with incredible deals. All of our products are $5 more today only, so you can enjoy buying them that much more.
I’m mad that you’re making a joke about Black Friday.
You’re probably a bad person.
Reception
The sale made people laugh, it was widely shared on Twitter and Tumblr, and it was the top post on Reddit. The press picked it up, and it was reported in The GuardianUSA TodayPolygonBuzzFeedAll Things DChicagoist, and AdWeek. It was even the top comment onThe Wirecutter’s front page AMA, which had nothing to do with us.
I was pretty sure that our fans would be into the “$5 more” sale, but I had no idea that it would turn a day where we’d normally be totally overlooked into a huge press hit for the game.
Sales
So how did we do? A little better than last year. We kept our position as the best-selling toy or game on Amazon. My guess is that peoples’ buying decisions just weren’t that affected by $5.
The interesting thing to note is that we got a nice lift in our sales the day after Black Friday (“Regret Saturday”). That might be from people who were waiting to buy the game until it came back down in price, or, more likely, those are sales from people who heard about the game after our Black Friday press. Not bad for an ad that paid us to run it.

This is just terrific. Was equally stoked on Everlane’s Blackout for Black Friday stunt last year. We had shut down our site on Thanksgiving this year because, well, it’s just ridiculous that people were getting up from family meals early wait in line at Walmart to get a "deal” on a TV they didn’t want or need in the first place.

But Cards Against Humanity really pulled off a winner here with a campaign that was as simple and clever as their product. Brilliant!